NHC is involved in a range of projects across Auckland, Waikato, Tairāwhiti, and Whanganui. Here's an introduction to some of our mahi.

Mana Kidz is all about giving children the best start in life

Mana Kidz

Mana Kidz is a successful nurse-led, school-based health programme reaching children in primary and intermediate schools in South Auckland. It provides  primary care services to more than 34,000 children across 88 primary and intermediate schools.

The NHC leads a network of primary care and community health providers to deliver the programme providing key support in programme development, network coordination, communications activity, clinical oversight & best practice, standardised tools & processes, quality improvement initiatives, and workforce development.

Mana Kidz has achieved a significant reduction (more than 60%) in the number of children developing acute rheumatic fever. Children are in hospital less and are generally in better health. Schools are reporting that attendance at school has improved and that children are more engaged in their education.


REDUCING IMPACTS OF LONG-TERM DIABETES BY IMPROVING HEALTH AND SOCIAL OUTCOMES

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Diabetes is a long-term condition in which there are significant ethnic and social disparities in prevalence and outcomes. There is huge scope to reduce diabetes inequalities. The complex nature of the condition means a comprehensive and sustained approach that tackles the wider determinants for causes, management and complications is required.

NHC is leading a major Health Research Council-funded research project to test Mana Tū – a programme co-designed with whānau, clinicians, health service planners and whānau ora providers to improve the impact of clinical and lifestyle interventions for whānau living with pre-diabetes and people with poorly controlled diabetes. 


WORKING WITH PEOPLE TO STAY IN WORK OR RETURN TO WORK QUICKER

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Mana Taimahi recognises the positive effects appropriate employment has on whānau and works with GPs to readdress the long-term use of work capacity medical certificates.

The aim is to support more people to stay in work or return to work by identifying what supports would best support maintaining employment or supporting a return to work. There's good evidence that that employment is a protective factor and is considered to be good for people. People in work are generally healthier and have better long term outcomes than those not in work. NHC has designed the programme in partnership with the Ministry of Social Development, and two NHC general practices based in West Auckland. The early outcomes have been promising and we are extending the programme to other practices in West Auckland and in Whanganui.

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The AWHI hub is working to ensure whānau have healthy homes

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The primary purpose of the programme is to increase the number of families living in warm, dry, less crowded housing, thereby decreasing the risk of exposure to preventable housing related conditions, such as Acute Rheumatic Fever and lower respiratory tract illnesses. 

The AWHI Hub co-ordinates and connects whanau and community providers to local services and organisations that help create warm, dry, healthy homes for children and families so they can have the best start in life.  At the heart of our approach is the recognition that supporting families in the Counties Manukau region also means ensuring they have the skills, confidence and education to make positive choices in ways that are meaningful to them.

We are working with the Ministry of Health, an evaluation team, public health experts and researchers to better understand the impact our work is having for whānau. Early findings show hospitalisations for key respiratory conditions have decreased due to the interventions delivered through AWHI. Whānau have reported that their homes are now warmer, drier, healthier and that there is less sickness in their household as a result.

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A kaupapa mĀori approach to intergenerational disadvantage

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Mana Ora works with young people who feel the impact of intergenerational welfare receipt. This mentoring and development programme is delivered through a strengths-based, kaupapa Māori approach, targeting Intergenerational Early Entrant Beneficiaries (18-24 years of age); young people whose parents were on a main benefit for a significant portion of their adolescence and whom entered the benefit system early.

It addresses a range of socio-economic factors contributing to intergenerational disadvantage and seeks to connect with young people, to equip them with the means necessary to look for employment and flourish in a job. Key programme activities include navigation through employment pathways, service brokerage and assistance with complex health and development issues, to enhance education and employment trajectories.

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT MANA ORA